My Interview With Rob L. Wagner: Saudi Women On Their Way To The Olympics (Spanish/Italian/French Translations)

23 MAY 2012 UPDATE: I ERRONEOUSLY SAID THAT WOMEN RUN DURING SA’I WHEN IN FACT RAMAL IS ONLY FOR MEN. I HAVE CORRECTED THIS ERROR. MAY ALLAH FORGIVE ME AMEEN!

French and Italian translations have been added as of 1 April 2012. Italian translation to follow later insha’Allah. My interview with Rob in its entirety can be found at the end of the article. Tara Umm Omar

Saudi Women On Their Way To The Olympics
By Rob L. Wagner
The Media Line
March 22, 2012

Kingdom to field female athletes, assuaging critics aboard, spurring controversy at home.

Crown Prince Nayef’s surprise announcement that Saudi Arabia expects to field at least one woman athlete in the Summer Olympics in London has sparked optimism among some women that the door to female participation in sports has opened a bit wider. Yet some Saudis caution that women should not sacrifice religious faith to appease Western critics of Saudi culture.

Saudi Arabia has come under withering criticism in the past year for its failure to provide physical education opportunities for girls at public schools and for preventing professional women’s sports teams from organizing. Human Rights Watch has been especially critical of the Saudi government, issuing a 51-page report in February documenting systematic discrimination against women in athletics.

Last year, Anita DeFranz, chief of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Women and Sports Commission, threatened to ban Saudi Arabia from the games if it didn’t send women athletes.

However, Crown Prince Nayef, regarded as a hardliner who maintains that Saudi Arabia adheres to the ultra-conservative Salafist ideology of Islam, followed King Abdullah’s game plan to broaden women’s rights. Women in recent months were given the right to vote, run for public office and to work in lingerie shops.

But women still do not have the right to drive an automobile in urban centers or travel abroad without a male guardian.

By participating in this summer’s London Olympics, Saudi women move a significant step closer to gaining rights that by competing on the international stage in football, basketball and other fields. The IOC will make a final decision on Saudi Arabia’s proposal in May.

Tara Umm Omar, a popular Riyadh-based blogger who advises women on Islamic and marriage issues, contends that the earliest Muslim women routinely engaged in sporting events.

“Islam encourages modesty for women, and to my knowledge there is nothing in the Qur’an and Sunnah [the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad] that discourages sports or exercise,” Omar told The Media Line. “The prophet raced Aisha, his wife, twice in their lives. Women rode horses in jihad excursions. Doesn’t that count for exercise? In fact, they are doing so in full view of men, albeit while covered.”

Fouzia Muhammad, 51, a teacher in Madinah, told The Media Line, that she now sees possibilities for her youngest daughter to compete in organized sports.

“I never had the opportunity to play sport when I was a teenager, and neither did my oldest girls,” Muhammad said. “But my youngest is 12. Hopefully by the time she is in secondary school, the government will see the benefit of having girls play sport.”

A likely candidate for the summer games is 18-year-old Dalma Rushdi Malhas, a Saudi equestrian who captured the bronze medal at the 2010 Youth Olympics.

Malhas’ medal win followed years of training. There are few, if any, Saudi women capable of competing at the Olympic level in any sport. However, the IOC often provides waivers to allow developing nations to send athletes under special conditions.

Although Saudi sports broadcaster and amateur footballer Reema Abdullah announced this week that she was named as one of 8,000 people to carry the Olympic torch in pre-games events, not all Saudis are convinced female participation is a good idea.

Saudi women who have made inroads in generally regarded masculine professions have not fared well. Saudi race car driver Marwa Al-Eifa and film director Haifaa Al-Mansour have garnered little support or attention from the Saudi media for their groundbreaking efforts to help Saudi women gain a foothold in sports or the arts. Both woman work in Dubai, where they can freely pursue their professions.

“There’s nothing special about these kinds of women, who show off to gain fame,” said Maryam Abdulkader, 41, a marketing professional based in Jeddah. “Why should Dalma Malhas be a role model for girls when every curve of her body is exposed for the world to see? My husband could never show his face to his family again if our daughters chose this path.”

Abdulkader echoes a wide-held belief among conservative Saudis that public displays of athleticism by women is shameful. Female role models should be limited to religious figures, such as the prophet’s wives, Aisha bint Abi Bakr and Khadija bint Khuwaylid, she said.

“Saudi Arabia is being pressured by the West to conform to their idea of morality,” Abdulkader said. “They have taken the hijab and made it a weapon against us. There can’t even be a discussion of Islamic modesty without Westerners turning it into some kind of extremist thought perpetuated by crazy Saudis. They [the IOC] will slowly chip away at a woman’s modesty to conform to their idea of what a athlete should wear and soon women will be stripped of all dignity.”

Umm Omar sees it differently, noting that Islam allows wiggle room. “As long as Muslim women are not compromising their religion and observing hijab, why not take advantage of concessions in Islam where it does not explicitly prohibit them from participating in sports like the London Olympics?” she said.

Umm Omar pointed to many sporting events that allow women to remain modest yet competitive.

“There are some sports where Muslim women can observe hijab and not be encumbered by their sports outfits, provided it is designed in a specific way to not impede their movements yet maintain modesty, like in the martial arts, fencing, skiing, equestrian, archery and shooting,” she said.

Prince Nayef said as much when he told the London-based Arab newspaper Al-Hayat that Saudi women can participate in the Olympics as long as the events “meet the standards of women’s decency and don’t contradict Islamic laws.”

Christoph Wilcke, Human Right Watch’s senior researcher in Germany, remains unconvinced. “While tokenistic participation is welcome, it wouldn’t change our position that the IOC should affect more systemic change,” he told The New York Times this week.

Umm Omar said that getting Saudi women into the Olympics is only the first step.

“It really depends on the woman’s understanding of what constitutes hijab and covering the ‘awrah [intimate parts of the body],” Umm Omar said. “This varies from different sects down to the individual. If she believes that wearing pants is haram [forbidden] unless covered by a garment that doesn’t show the shape of her legs, how will she compete in this way? Can she compete this way? Would the IOC allow her to complete this way?”

Photo Credit: The Media Line

MY INTERVIEW WITH ROB L. WAGNER
By Tara Umm Omar
22 March 2012

Islam encourages modesty for women and to my knowledge, there is nothing in the Qur’an and Sunnah that discourages sports and/or exercise. The Prophet (peace be upon him) raced Aisha (may Allah be pleased with her) twice in their lives, when they were young and she beat him and later on when they were older and he beat her to playfully avenge her defeat of him in their earlier race. Women rode horses in jihad excursions. Doesn’t that count for exercise? Matter of fact, they are doing so in full view of men albeit while covered. As long as Muslim women are not compromising their religion and observing hijab, why not take advantage of concessions in Islam where it does not explicitly prohibit them from partaking in sports, i.e., the London Olympics?

There are some sports where Muslim women can observe hijab and not be encumbered by their sports outfits, provided it is designed in a specific way to not impede their movements yet maintain modesty: martial arts, fencing, skiing, equestrian, archery, golf, canoeing/kayaking, bowling, sailing, rowing, shooting and table tennis. Of course, the International Olympic Committee must agree on their form of dress as acceptable for competition. In order to know if Saudi women are ready for the Olympics, you must let them compete to qualify! We will never know unless they try and they can never try unless we let them.

It really depends on the woman’s understanding of what constitutes hijab and covering the ‘awrah. As you know, this varies from different sects down to the individual. If she believes that wearing pants is haram unless covered by a garment that doesn’t show the shape of her legs, how will she compete in this way? CAN she compete this way? Would the IOC allow her to complete this way? If Saudi Arabia does permit its female athletes to participate in the Olympics, the end goal should be for them be to please Allah because jannah is the most precious medal they could ever win.

_____BEGIN SPANISH TRANSLATION_____

Mujeres Sauditas En El camino Hacia Las Olimpiadas
Escrito por Rob L. Wagner
Marzo 22, 2012
Traducción al Español de Cristina D.

El Reino de Arabia Saudita desplegando atletas femeninas, calmando los críticos a bordo, estimulando la controversia en el país.

El anuncio sorpresa del Príncipe Nayef de que Arabia Saudita espera que por lo menos una mujer atleta este en el campo de los Juegos Olímpicos de Verano en Londres ha generado optimismo entre algunas mujeres que la puerta a la participación femenina en el deporte se ha abierto un poco más amplio. Sin embargo, algunos Sauditas advierten que las mujeres no deben sacrificar la fe religiosa para apaciguar a los críticos occidentales de la cultura Saudita.

Arabia Saudita ha sido criticado en el pasado año por su falta de oportunidades de educación física para las niñas en las escuelas públicas y la prevención de la organización de formar equipos de deportes de mujeres profesionales. Los Observadores de los Derechos Humanos ha sido especialmente críticos con el gobierno de Arabia Saudita, emitiendo de un informe de 51 páginas en febrero documentando la discriminación sistemática contra las mujeres en el atletismo.

El año pasado, Anita DeFranz, jefe del Comité Olímpico Internacional (COI), la Comisión la Mujer y los Deportes, amenazó con prohibir a Arabia Saudita de participar en los juegos si no enviaba a mujeres atletas.

Sin embargo, el príncipe Nayef, considerado como un político de línea dura que sostiene que Arabia Saudita se adhiere a la ideología Salafista (Ancestros justos Islamicos) ultraconservadora del Islam, siguió el plan del Rey Abdullah para ampliar los derechos de las mujeres. Las mujeres en los últimos meses se les ha dado el derecho a votar, postularse para un cargo público y para trabajar en tiendas de lencería.

Pero las mujeres todavía no tienen el derecho a conducir un automóvil en los centros urbanos o viajar al extranjero sin un tutor varón.

Al participar en los Juegos Olímpicos de este verano en Londres, las mujeres sauditas dan un paso significantemente más cerca de obtener los derechos para competir en escena internacional en el fútbol, baloncesto y otros campos. El COI tomará una decisión final sobre la propuesta de Arabia Saudita en mayo.

Tara Umm Omar, una popular bloguera con sede en Riyadh, que aconseja a las mujeres en temas islámicos y el matrimonio, sostiene que las primeras mujeres musulmanas participan habitualmente en eventos deportivos.

“El Islam anima a la modestia de las mujeres, y que yo sepa no hay nada en el Corán y la Sunna [las enseñanzas del Profeta Muhammad] que desalienta a hacer deporte o ejercicio”, dijo Omar a The Media Line (La línea de los medios de comunicación). “El profeta reto corrió con Aisha, su esposa, dos veces en su vida. Las mujeres montaban a caballo en excursiones en Jihad (esfuerzo o lucha en el camino hacia Dios) . ¿Eso no cuenta para hacer ejercicio? De hecho, lo hacían a la vista de los hombres, aunque mientras estaban cubiertas.”

Fouzia Muhammad, de 51 años, un maestro en Medina, dijo a The Media Line, que ahora ve las posibilidades de que su hija menor pueda competir en deportes organizados.

“Nunca he tenido la oportunidad de jugar el deporte cuando era un adolescente, y tampoco mis hijas mayores”, dijo Muhammad. “Pero la menor tiene 12 años. Esperemos que para el momento en que está en la escuela secundaria, el gobierno vea el beneficio de que las niñas jueguen un deporte”

Una candidata probable para los juegos de verano es Dalma Rushdi Malhas de 18 años de edad, una jinete de Arabia Saudita que capturó la medalla de bronce en los Juegos Olímpicos de la Juventud 2010.

La ganadora de la medalla Malha siguió años de entrenamiento. Hay pocos, si las hubiera, mujeres sauditas capaces de competir a nivel olímpico en cualquier deporte. Sin embargo, el COI proporciona a menudo exenciones para permitir que las naciones en desarrollo puedan enviar atletas en condiciones especiales.

Aunque la comentarista deportiva y aficionado futbolista Reema Abdullah anunció esta semana que fue nombrada como una de las 8.000 personas para llevar la antorcha olímpica en los eventos de pre-juegos, no todos los sauditas están convencidos de que la participación femenina es una buena idea.

Las mujeres sauditas que han hecho incursiones en general, en lo que se consideran profesiones masculinas no les ha ido bien. La corredora de autos Saudita Marwa Al-Eifa y la directora de cine Haifaa Al-Mansour han contado con poco apoyo o la atención de los medios de comunicación sauditas por sus esfuerzos innovadores para ayudar a las mujeres sauditas a hacerse un hueco en el deporte o las artes. Ambas mujeres trabajan en Dubai, donde pueden buscar libremente su profesión.

“No hay nada especial sobre este tipo de mujeres, quienes se exhiben para ganar fama”, dijo Maryam Abdulkader, de 41 años, una profesional de marketing con sede en Jeddah. “¿Por qué Dalma Malhas debe ser una modelo a seguir para las niñas, cuando cada curva de su cuerpo se expone al mundo para ser vista? Mi marido nunca podría mostrar su cara a su familia si nuestras hijas eligieran ese camino. ”

Abdulkader hace eco en mantener una gran creencia entre las sauditas conservadoras que las demostraciones públicas de atletismo de las mujeres es una vergüenza. Modelos femeninos de conducta deben limitarse a las figuras religiosas, como las esposas del profeta, Aisha bint Abi Bakr y Khadija bint Juwaylid, dijo.

“Arabia Saudita está siendo presionada por Occidente para cumplir con su idea de la moralidad”, dijo Abdulkader. “Se han llevado el hijab (velo islámico) y lo han convertido en un arma contra nosotros. No puede haber incluso una discusión de la modestia islámica sin los occidentales lo conviertan en una especie de pensamiento extremista perpetuado por los sauditas locos. Ellos (el COI) poco a poco deteriora la modestia de una mujer para cumplir con su idea de lo que un atleta debe usar y muy pronto las mujeres serán despojadas de toda su dignidad. ”

Umm Omar lo ve de otra manera, teniendo en cuenta que nada como el Islam permite la flexibilidad o exploración de opciones. “Mientras las mujeres musulmanas no estén comprometiendo su religión y observen de hijab, ¿por qué no tomar ventaja de las concesiones en el Islam donde no les prohíbe explícitamente la participación en deportes como las Olimpiadas de Londres?”, Dijo.

Umm Omar señaló que muchos eventos deportivos que permitan a las mujeres seguir siendo modestas pero competitivas.

“Hay algunos deportes en los que las mujeres musulmanas pueden observar el hijab y no ser agravado por sus atuendos deportivos, siempre que sean diseñado de forma específica para no obstaculizar sus movimientos sin embargo, mantener la modestia, al igual que en las artes marciales, esgrima, esquí, equitación, tiro con arco y disparar “, dijo.

El príncipe Nayef dijo lo mismo cuando le dijo al periódico árabe Al-Hayat con sede en Londres que las mujeres sauditas pueden participar en los Juegos Olímpicos, siempre y cuando los acontecimientos “cumplan con las normas de la decencia de las mujeres y no contradigan las leyes islámicas.”

Christoph Wilcke, investigador superior de Observadores de Derechos Humanos en Alemania, sigue sin estar convencido. “Si bien la participación simbólica es bienvenida, no iba a cambiar nuestra posición de que el COI debe influir mas en el cambio sistémico”, dijo a The New York Times esta semana.

Umm Omar dijo que lograr que las mujeres sauditas participen en los Juegos Olímpicos es sólo el primer paso.

“Realmente depende de la comprensión de la mujer de lo que constituye el hijab y que abarca el awrah “(las partes íntimas del cuerpo)”, dijo Umm Omar. “Esto varía de diferentes sectas hasta el individuo. Si ella cree que el uso de los pantalones es haram (prohibido) que no estén cubiertos por una prenda que no muestra la forma de sus piernas, ¿cómo va a competir de esta forma? ¿Puede competir de esta manera? ¿El COI le permitara completar de esta manera? ”

LA VERSION NO EDITADA DE MI ENTREVISTA

El Islam alienta la modestia de las mujeres y que yo sepa, no hay nada en el Corán y la Sunnah que desalienta a los deportes y / o ejercicio. El Profeta (la paz sea con él) compitió con Aisha (que Allah esté complacido con ella) dos veces en su vida, cuando eran jóvenes y ella lo desafio y luego cuando eran mayores y ella lo desafío en broma para vengar su derrota de su carrera de antes. Las mujeres montaban a caballo en excursiones en Jihad. ¿Eso no cuenta para hacer ejercicio? De hecho, lo hacian a la vista de los hombres si bien mientras estaban cubiertas. Mientras las mujeres musulmanas no están comprometiendo su religión y la observación de hijab, ¿por qué no tomar ventaja de las concesiones en el Islam, donde no se menciona explícitamente que se les prohíbe tomar parte en los deportes, es decir, los Juegos Olímpicos de Londres?

Hay algunos deportes en los que las mujeres musulmanas pueden observar el hijab sin ser agravadas por sus atuendos deportivos, siempre que sean diseñado de forma específica para no obstaculizar sus movimientos sin embargo, mantener la modestia: artes marciales, esgrima, esquí, equitación, tiro con arco, golf, piragüismo / kayak, bolos, vela, remo, tiro y tenis de mesa. Por supuesto, el Comité Olímpico Internacional debe estar de acuerdo en su forma de vestir como aceptables para la competencia. Con el fin de saber si las mujeres sauditas están listas para los Juegos Olímpicos, hay que dejar competir para optar! Nunca lo sabremos a menos que se trate y nunca se puede tratar a menos que se los permitimos.

Realmente depende de la comprensión de la mujer de lo que constituye el hijab y que abarca el awrah. Como ustedes saben, esto varía en diferentes sectas hasta el individuo. Si ella cree que el uso de los pantalones es haram (prohibido) no estén cubiertos por una prenda que no muestra la forma de sus piernas, ¿cómo va a competir de esta forma? ¿Puede competir de esta manera? ¿El COI le permita completar de esta manera? Si Arabia Saudita permitir a sus atletas a participar en los Juegos Olímpicos, el objetivo final para ellas debe ser agradar a Dios, porque el Paraíso es la medalla más preciosa que jamás podrían ganar.

_____BEGIN ITALIAN TRANSLATION_____

Le Donne Saudite Sulla Strada Delle Olimpiadi
Scritto da Rob L. Wagner
22 Marzo 2012
Traduzione Italiana di A.P.

Il Regno mette in campo atlete, placando i critici all’estero, sollevando polemiche in casa.

L’annuncio a sorpresa del principe ereditario Nayef che l’Arabia Saudita si aspetta di mettere in campo almeno un’atleta nelle Olimpiadi estive di Londra ha suscitato ottimismo tra alcune donne che sia stato aperto uno spiraglio più ampio alla partecipazione femminile negli sport. Tuttavia alcuni sauditi mettono in guardia sul fatto che le donne non dovrebbero sacrificare la fede religiosa per placare i critici occidentali della cultura saudita.

L’Arabia Saudita è stata oggetto di critiche fulminanti l’anno scorso per non essere stata in grado di fornire opportunità di educazione fisica alle ragazze nelle scuole pubbliche e per aver impedito l’organizzazione di squadre professionali sportive femminili. Human Rights Watch ha particolarmente criticato il governo saudita attraverso la pubblicazione di un rapporto di 51 pagine uscito in febbraio che ha documentato la sistematica discriminazione contro le donne nell’atletica.

L’anno scorso Anita DeFranz, a capo della Commissione Donne e Sport del Comitato Olimpico Internazionale (IOC), ha minacciato di escludere l’Arabia Saudita dai giochi se non avesse mandato delle atlete.

Tuttavia, il Principe ereditario Nayef, considerato un intransigente che sostiene che l’Arabia Saudita aderisce all’ideologia islamica salafita ultra-conservatrice, ha seguito lo schema di gioco del re Abdullah nell’allargamento dei diritti delle donne. Negli ultimi mesi alle donne è stato riconosciuto il diritto di votare, di ricoprire cariche pubbliche e di lavorare nei negozi di lingerie.

Ma le donne non hanno ancora il diritto di guidare una macchina nei centri urbani o di viaggiare all’estero senza un tutore maschio.

Partecipando alle Olimpiadi estive londinesi le donne saudite compiono un significativo passo avanti nella conquista dei diritti, e questo attraverso la competizione sulla scena internazionale nel calcio, nella pallacanestro e altri campi. Il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale prenderà in maggio la decisione definitiva in merito alla proposta dell’Arabia Saudita.

Tara Umm Omar, popolare blogger che vive a Riyadh e che fornisce consigli alle donne in materia di Islam e matrimonio, afferma che le prime donne musulmane erano abitualmente presenti negli eventi sportivi.

“L’Islam incoraggia la modestia per le donne, e a quanto so non c’è nulla nel Corano e nella Sunnah [gli insegnamenti del Profeta Maometto] che scoraggi gli sport o l’esercizio fisico”, ha detto Tara a The Media Line. “Il Profeta ha gareggiato con Aisha, sua moglie, due volte nella loro vita. Le donne montavano cavalli in occasione delle spedizioni militari. Quello non è esercizio fisico? In effetti, lo fanno esposte completamente alla vista degli uomini, sebbene coperte”.

Fouzia Muhammad, 51 anni, insegnante a Medina, ha detto a Media Line che adesso vede delle possibilità per la sua figlia più piccola di prendere parte a competizioni sportive.

“Non ho mai avuto l’opportunità di fare sport quando ero adolescente, e neanche le mie figlie maggiori”, ha detto Muhammad. “Ma la mia figlia più piccola ha dodici anni, e spero che per l’epoca in cui frequenterà la scuola superiore il governo capisca i benefici di far fare attività sportiva alle ragazze”.

La probabile candidata per le Olimpiadi estive è la diciottenne Dalma Rushdi Malhas, una cavallerizza saudita che ha vinto la medaglia di bronzo alle Olimpiadi Giovanili del 2010.

La medaglia della Malhas è arrivata dopo anni di allenamento. Ci sono poche, se ce ne sono, donne saudite capaci di competere a livello olimpico in qualche sport. Tuttavia, il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale spesso concede delle deroghe per consentire ai paesi in via di sviluppo di inviare atleti a determinate condizioni.

Sebbene la giornalista sportiva e calciatrice amatoriale saudita Reema Abdullah abbia annunciato questa settimana che sarà tra le 8.000 persone che porteranno la torcia olimpica durante gli eventi pre-olimpici, non tutti i sauditi sono convinti che la partecipazione femminile sia una buona idea.

Le saudite che si sono fatte strada all’interno di professioni generalmente considerate maschili non hanno avuto grande successo. Il pilota (donna) di gare automobilistiche Marwa Al-Eifa e la regista Haifaa Al-Mansour hanno ottenuto scarso supporto o attenzione da parte dei media sauditi nei loro sforzi innovativi per aiutare le donne saudite a prendere piede nello sport o nell’arte. Entrambe lavorano a Dubai, dove possono esercitare liberamente la loro professione.

“Non c’è niente di speciale in queste donne che si mettono in mostra per diventare famose”, ha detto Maryam Abdulkader, 41 anni, una specialista di marketing che vive a Jeddah. “Perchè Dalma Malhas dovrebbe essere un modello per le ragazze quando ogni curva del suo corpo è esposta alla vista di tutto il mondo? Mio marito non potrebbe più mostrare la faccia alla sua famiglia se le nostre figlie seguissero quella strada”.

Abdulkader riecheggia una convinzione ampiamente diffusa tra i sauditi conservatori in base alla quale la dimostrazione pubblica di doti atletiche da parte delle donne è vergognosa. Secondo lei, i modelli femminili dovrebbero limitarsi a figure religiose quali le mogli del profeta, Aisha bint Abi Bakr e Khadija bint Khuwaylid.

“L’Arabia Saudita viene messa sotto pressione dall’Occidente perchè si conformi alla sua idea di moralità”, ha detto Abdulkader. “Hanno preso l’hijiab e ne hanno fatto un’arma contro di noi”. Non si può neanche discutere di modestia islamica senza che gli occidentali la trasformino in una specie di pensiero estremista portato avanti da pazzi sauditi. Loro [il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale] sgretoleranno gradualmente la modestia femminile perchè ci si conformi alla loro idea di cosa un’atleta dovrebbe indossare e presto le donne verranno spogliate di ogni dignità”.

Umm Omar la vede in modo diverso, e nota che l’Islam consente una comprensione diversa. “Purchè le donne musulmane non compromettano la loro religione ed osservino l’hijab, perchè non approfittare delle concessioni dell’Islam laddove esso non proibisce loro esplicitamente la partecipazione alle attività sportive come le Olimpiadi di Londra?”, ha detto.

Umm Omar ha citato molti sport che consentono alle donne di rimanere modeste e tuttavia competitive.

“Ci sono alcuni sport in cui le donne musulmane possono osservare l’hijiab e non essere impacciate dal loro abbigliamento sportivo, purchè sia disegnato in modo tale da non impedire i movimenti mantenendo comunque la modestia, come le arti marziali, la scherma, lo sci, l’equitazione, il tiro con l’arco e la caccia”, ha detto.

Il Principe Nayef ha detto la stessa cosa quando ha affermato al quotidiano arabo Al-Hayat che ha sede a Londra che le donne saudite possono partecipare alle Olimpiadi purchè le gare “soddisfino gli standard della modestia femminile e non contraddicano le leggi islamiche”.

Christoph Wilcke, senior researcher in Germania di Human Rights Watch, continua a non essere convinto. “Una partecipazione simbolica è la benvenuta, ma non cambierebbe la nostra posizione secondo la quale il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale dovrebbe stimolare un cambiamento più generale”, ha detto questa settimana al New York Times.

Umm Omar ha detto che far partecipare le donne saudite alle Olimpiadi è solo il primo passo.

“Davvero dipende da come una donna intende l’hijiab e la copertura delle ‘awrah [parti intime del corpo], ha detto Umm Omar. “Questo varia dalle diverse sette fino al singolo individuo. Se una pensa che indossare pantaloni è haram [proibito] a meno che non sia coperta da un capo di abbigliamento che impedisce la vista della forma delle sue gambe, come potrà gareggiare vestita così? Può gareggiare così? Il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale le permetterebbe di gareggiare vestita così?”

LA VERSIONE NON PUBBLICATA DELLA MIA INTERVISTA

L’Islam incoraggia la modestia per le donne, e a quanto so non c’è nulla nel Corano e nella Sunnah che scoraggi gli sport e/o l’esercizio fisico. Il Profeta (sia pace su di lui) ha gareggiato con Aisha (possa Allah compiacersi di lei) due volte nella loro vita, quando erano giovani, e lei lo ha battuto, e poi successivamente, quando erano vecchi, e lui l’ha battuta per vendicarsi scherzosamente di lei che lo aveva battuto nella sfida precedente. Le donne montavano cavalli in occasione delle spedizioni militari. E anche correvano tra Safaa e Marwa se erano in grado di farlo. Quello non è esercizio fisico? In effetti, lo fanno esposte completamente alla vista degli uomini, sebbene coperte. Purchè le donne musulmane non compromettano la loro religione ed osservino l’hijab, perchè non approfittare delle concessioni dell’Islam laddove esso non proibisce loro esplicitamente la partecipazione alle attività sportive come le Olimpiadi di Londra?”

Ci sono alcuni sport in cui le donne musulmane possono osservare l’hijiab e non essere impacciate dal loro abbigliamento sportivo, purchè sia disegnato in modo tale da non impedire i movimenti mantenendo comunque la modestia, come le arti marziali, la scherma, lo sci, l’equitazione, il tiro con l’arco, il golf, canoa/kayak, bowling, vela, canottaggio, caccia e ping pong. Certo, il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale deve essere d’accordo sul fatto che il loro abbigliamento è accettabile per le gare. Per sapere se le donne saudite sono pronte per le Olimpiadi, bisogna lasciarle gareggiare per qualificarsi! Non lo sapremo mai se non provano e non potranno mai provare se non diamo loro il permesso.

Davvero dipende da come una donna intende l’hijiab e la copertura delle ‘awrah. Come si sa, questo varia dalle diverse sette fino al singolo individuo. Se una pensa che indossare pantaloni è haram a meno che non sia coperta da un capo di abbigliamento che impedisce la vista della forma delle sue gambe, come potrà gareggiare vestita così? PUO’ gareggiare così? Il Comitato Olimpico Internazionale le permetterebbe di gareggiare vestita così? Se l’Arabia Saudita permette alle sue atlete di partecipare alle Olimpiadi, l’obiettivo finale sarebbe per loro di compiacere Allah, perchè il Paradiso è la medaglia più preziosa che potrebbero mai vincere.

_____BEGIN FRENCH TRANSLATION_____

Les Femmes Saoudiennes Sur Leur Chemin Vers les Jeux Olympiques
Écrit par Rob L. Wagner
22 Mars 2012
Traduction Française par Aisha M.

L’Arabie Saoudite va présenter des athlètes féminines, apaisant les critiques à l’étranger, incitant la controverse à domicile.

L’annonce surprise du prince héritier Nayef que l’Arabie Saoudite prévoit présenter au moins un athlète femme aux Jeux olympiques d’été à Londres a suscité l’optimisme chez certaines femmes que la porte pour la participation des femmes au sport a été un peu plus ouverte. Pourtant, certains saoudiens avertissent que les femmes ne doivent pas sacrifier leur foi pour apaiser les critiques occidentales de la culture saoudienne.
L ‘année dernière, l’Arabie Saoudite a fait l’objet des critiques virulentes dans son incapacité d’offrir des possibilités d’éducation physique aux filles dans les écoles publiques et d’empecher les équipes sportives professionnelles feminines de s’organiser. Le groupe des droits de l’homme, Human Rights Watch, a été particulièrement critique envers le gouvernement saoudien, délivrant un rapport de 51 pages en février portant sur la discrimination systématique contre les femmes en athlétisme.

En 2011, Anita DeFranz, chef du Comité International Olympique (CIO) et de la commission femme et sport, a menacé d’interdire l’Arabie Saoudite de participer aux jeux si elle ne présentait pas d’athlètes féminines.

Cependant, le prince héritier Nayef, considéré comme un partisan qui soutient que l’ Arabie Saoudite adhère à l’idéologie salafiste ultra-conservatrice de l’Islam, a suivi le plan de jeu du roi Abdallah d’élargir les droits des femmes. Au cours des ces derniers mois les femmes ont obtenues le droit de voter, de se présenter aux élections et à travailler dans les magasins de lingerie.

Mais les femmes n’ont toujours pas le droit de conduire un véhicule dans les centres urbains ou de voyager à l’étranger sans un tuteur de sexe masculin.

En participant aux Jeux olympiques cet été à Londres, les femmes saoudiennes font un pas important pour obtenir les droits de concourir sur la scène internationale dans le football, basket-ball et d’autres disciplines. Le CIO rendra une décision finale sur la proposition de l’Arabie Saoudite en mai.

Tara Umm Omar, bloggeuse connue résidant à Riyad, qui conseille les femmes sur les questions islamiques et le mariage, soutient que les prèmieres femmes musulmanes étaient régulièrement engagées dans des événements sportifs.

“L’islam encourage la pudeur des femmes et à ma connaissance, il n’y a rien dans le Coran et la Sunna (les enseignements du prophète Mohamed) qui décourage le sport ou l’exercice,” dit Omar à The Media Line. “Le prophète a fait courir Aisha, son épouse, deux fois dans leur vie. Les femmes montaient à cheval dans les excursions du jihad. Est-ce que ceci n’est pas un exercice? En fait, elles le font à la vue des hommes, bien que étant couvertes. ”

Fouzia Muhammad, 51 ans, professeur à Médina, a déclaré à The Media Line, qu’elle voit maintenant les possibilités pour sa plus jeune fille de participer à des sports organisés.

“Je n’ai jamais eu l’occasion de faire du sport quand j’étais adolescente, ni aucune de mes filles aînées,” dit Muhammad. “Mais ma plus jeune fille a 12 ans. Espérons que d’ici le moment où elle atteindra l’école secondaire, le gouvernement verra l’avantage de laisser les filles faire du sport. ”

Dalma Rushdi Malhas, âgée de 18 ans, est une candidate probable pour les jeux d’été. Elle est une cavalière saoudienne qui a remportée la médaille de bronze aux Jeux olympiques de la jeunesse de 2010.

Malhas a remporté la médaille après des années d’entrainement. Il y a peu, le cas échéant, des femmes saoudiennes capables de concourir au niveau olympique dans n’importe quel discipline. Cependant, le CIO fournit souvent des dérogations pour permettre aux nations en développement d’envoyer des athlètes dans des conditions particulières.

Bien que Reema Abdallah, animatrice du sport saoudien et amateur de football, a annoncé cette semaine qu’elle a été nommée comme l’une des 8,000 personnes pour porter le flambeau olympique pendant les événements avant les jeux, quelques saoudiens ne sont pas convaincus que la participation des femmes est une bonne idée.

Les femmes saoudiennes qui ont entamées les professions généralement considérées masculines n’ont pas obtenues de bons résultats. La pilote de course Marwa Al-Eifa et réalisatrice Haifaa Al-Mansour ont suscitées peu de soutien ou de l’attention des médias saoudiens pour leurs efforts remarquables pour aider les femmes saoudiennes de prendre pied dans les sports ou les arts. Ces deux femmes saoudiennes travaillent à Dubaï où elles peuvent librement exercer leur profession.

“Il n’y a rien de spécial au sujet de ces sortes de femmes qui friment pour devenir célèbre” a déclaré Maryam Abdulkader, 41 ans, professionnelle du marketing basée à Jeddah. “Pourquoi est-ce que Dalma Malhas doit être un modèle pour les filles quand ses formes sont exposées au regard du monde entier? Mon mari ne pourrait jamais montrer son visage à sa famille à nouveau si nos filles choisissent cette voie. ”

Abdulkader répète une croyance largement soutenue parmi les saoudiens conservateurs que les démonstrations publiques (dans le cadre de l’athlétisme) par les femmes sont honteux. Les modèles féminins devraient être limités à des personnalités religieuses, comme les épouses du prophète, Aïcha bint Abi Bakr et Khadija bint Khuwaylid, dit-elle.

“L’Arabie Saoudite est l’objet de pressions de l’Occident pour se conformer à leur idée de la moralité”, a déclaré Abdulkader. “Ils ont pris le hijab et en a fait une arme contre nous. On ne peut même pas avoir une discussion sur la pudeur islamique sans que les Occidentaux ne la transforment en une sorte de pensée extrémiste perpétuée par des Saoudiens fous. Ils (le CIO) vont lentement grignoter la pudeur d’une femme de se conformer à leur idée de ce qu’une athlète doit porter et bientôt les femmes seront dépouillées de toute dignité. ”

Umm Omar voit les choses différemment, notant que l’Islam autorise une flexibilité d’interprétation. “Tant que les femmes musulmanes ne compromettent pas leur religion et elles mettent le hijab, pourquoi ne pas profiter de concessions dans l’islam qui n’interdisent pas explicitement la participation des femmes à des sports comme les Jeux olympiques de Londres?” dit-elle.

Umm Omar a cité de nombreuses manifestations sportives qui permettent aux femmes de rester modeste mais en concurrence.

“Il y a certains sports où les femmes musulmanes peuvent garder le hijab et être comfortables dans leurs tenues de sport, à condition qu’elles soient conçues de manière spécifique pour ne pas entraver leurs mouvements tout en préservant la pudeur, comme dans les arts martiaux, l’escrime, le ski, l’équitation, le tir à l’arc et le tir », a t-elle dit.

Le prince Nayef a autant déclaré quand il a dit au journal arabe basé à Londres, Al-Hayat, que les femmes saoudiennes peuvent participer aux Jeux olympiques tant que les événements “répondent aux normes de la décence des femmes et ne contredisent pas les lois islamiques.”

Christoph Wilcke, chercheur supérieur dans Human Right Watch en Allemagne, n’est toujours pas convaincu. “Bien que la participation symbolique est la bienvenue, cela ne changerait pas notre avis que le CIO devrait influer sur un changement plus systémique”, a-t-il déclaré au New York Times cette semaine.

Umm Omar a dit que faire participer les femmes saoudiennes aux les Jeux olympiques n’est que la première étape.

“Cela dépend vraiment de la compréhension de la femme de ce que constitue le hijab et couvrir la ‘awra’ (parties intimes du corps),” a dit Umm Omar. “Ceci varie en fonction d’une secte ou d’un individu. Si elle croit que le port de pantalon est haram (interdit) sauf si ceci est couvert par un vêtement qui ne montre pas la forme de ses jambes, comment peut-elle concourrir de cette façon? Peut-elle concourrir de cette façon? Est-ce que le CIO lui permettrait de concourrir de cette façon? ”

La Version Inédite De Mon Interview

L’islam encourage la pudeur des femmes et à ma connaissance, il n’y a rien dans le Coran et la Sunna qui décourage le sports et / ou I’exercice. Le Prophète (paix soit sur lui) a fait courir Aisha (qu’Allah soit satisfait d’elle) deux fois dans leur vie quand ils étaient jeunes et elle l’a battu, et plus tard quand ils étaient plus âgés et il l’a battue pour se venger (avec espieglérie) de sa défaite dans leur course d’auparavant. Les femmes montaient à cheval dans les excursions du jihad. Elles courent aussi entre Safaa et Marwa si elles sont en mesure de le faire. Est-ce que ceci n’est pas un exercice ? En fait, elles le font à la vue des hommes mais étant couverte. Tant que les femmes musulmanes ne compromettent pas leur religion et elles portent le hijab, pourquoi ne pas profiter de concessions dans l’islam qui n’interdisent pas explicitement la participation des femmes à des sports comme les Jeux olympiques de Londres?

Il y a certains sports où les femmes musulmanes peuvent garder le hijab et être comfortables dans leurs tenues de sport, à condition qu’elles soit conçues de manière spécifique pour ne pas entraver leurs mouvements tout en conservant la modestie: arts martiaux, l’escrime, le ski, l’équitation, le tir à l’arc, le golf, le canoë-kayak / kayak, le bowling, la voile, l’aviron, le tir et le tennis de table. Bien sûr, le Comité international Olympique doit s’entendre sur la forme de leur robe qui est acceptable pour la compétition. Afin de savoir si les femmes saoudiennes sont prêtes pour les Jeux olympiques, vous devez les laisser compétir pour se qualifier! Nous ne saurons jamais à moins qu’elles essaient et elles ne peuvent jamais essayer, à moins que nous ne les donnons cette occasion.

Cela dépend vraiment de la compréhension de la femme de ce que constitue le hijab et couvrir la ‘awra’. Comme vous le savez, ceci varie en fonction d’une secte ou d’un individu. Si elle croit que le port de pantalon est haram (interdit) sauf si ceci est couvert par un vêtement qui ne montre pas la forme de ses jambes, comment peut-elle concourrir de cette façon? Peut-elle concourrir de cette façon? Est-ce que le CIO lui permettrait de concourrir de cette façon? Si l’Arabie Saoudite autorise ses athlètes féminines de participer aux Jeux olympiques, l’objectif final devrait être pour elles de faire plaisir à Allah, car jannah est la médaille la plus précieuse qu’elles ne pourraient jamais gagner.

Advertisements

Published by

Tara Umm Omar

American married to a Saudi.

A penny for your thoughts...

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s